Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death #PatrickHenry #History #Inspiration

Patrick Henry / Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Patrick Henry / Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

“Give me liberty or give me death…” American lawyer, Patrick Henry addressed the House of Burgesses in Richmond, Virginia on this day, March 23, 1775 making his case for supporting military action against the British.

His rousing speech is credited as the turning point in Virginia offering militiamen to join the George Washington’s Continental Army to support the Revolutionary War that was soon coming.

Looking back at history and seeing courageous men such as Patrick Henry, willing to die for the cause of independence in the colonies, Washington fighting with a rag-tag group of untrained recruits against the most powerful army in the world, the signers of the Declaration of Independence, all who would have been hung from the gallows as traitors against the British if the war for independence had failed. These heroes risked everything to establish the United States of America, now arguably the greatest country in the world, and despite its many flaws, it remains a bastion of freedom for all the world to see.

Some of the most inspiring parts of the “re-enacted” speech can be found below. The full speech can be found on The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s website.


St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia
March 23, 1775.

MR. PRESIDENT: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do, opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely, and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the House is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at truth, and fulfill the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country…

Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.

…Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne. In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room for hope. If we wish to be free if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us!

…Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations; and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave…

It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

Source: Wirt, William. Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry . (Philadelphia) 1836, as reproduced in The World’s Great Speeches, Lewis Copeland and Lawrence W. Lamm, eds., (New York) 1973.

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation – History.org

Listen to a full re-enactment of Patrick Henry’s entire speech to the House of Burgesses in Williamsburg, Virginia on History.org’s site here.

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